Office of Procedures, Records, and Forms Executive Policy Manual

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Executive Policy #35
Approved April 16, 2014

Washington State University Space Allocation Policies

Policies

All Washington State University buildings, space, and land, regardless of fund source or location, belong to the University as a whole.

Access the following links to view campus policies regarding these assets:

WSU Pullman Campus Space Allocation Policy

Overview

All Washington State University buildings, space, and land, regardless of fund source or location, belong to the University as a whole.

Long-range planning for optimum use of these valuable University assets is a continuing process.

All WSU Pullman space is subject to assignment and reassignment by the President or his/her designees to meet the overall needs and best interest of the institution.

NOTE: This policy does not replace BPPM 20.45 as it relates to real property.

Implementation Guidelines

Impact of Budget Decisions

During each annual budget review process, the impact of budget decisions on assigned space is addressed. Accordingly, information about the needs regarding amount and suitability of space is gathered as a routine part of the information the Budget Office solicits from areas. As an outcome of each unit’s total operating or capital budget decisions, vacant space may be created, existing space may need to be reassigned, and/or existing space may need to be renovated.

Space Allocation Requests

Space allocation requests that occur outside the annual budget review process are to be directed to Facilities Services, Space Management Office.

Space Assignment Decisions

Space assignment decisions are based upon thorough review of the subject space in relation to the University’s strategic priorities, including costs associated with using the space.

Review of Subject Space

The review includes, but is not limited to, the following factors:

  • Facility cost of maintenance and operations. (State allocations for maintenance and operations (M&O) are less than required. To the degree possible, there are financial pressures to consolidate space in order to efficiently use the available funding.)
  • Technology infrastructure suitability, HVAC, repairs.
  • Alternate uses of subject space. (In meeting a requesting unit’s need for a particular space, are there other spaces that would meet their needs in a less expensive or quicker way?)
  • Competing needs and their strategic importance. (If two or more units request the same space, how can the University meet the needs of the units; e.g., what alternative space meets the needs of one or the other of the units?)
  • Future plans for the existing facility. (Evaluate the level of capital investment in a building against the expected years of use; e.g., if the building is the future site for a larger building.)
  • Acquisition of new buildings (including purchase or construction) and/or leased space.
Existing Facilities

In the absence of a documented decision to the contrary, a vacating unit is responsible for securing the funding for the move if the unit initiates the move. If the move is involuntary, the unit is not required to cover the costs of moving and the associated cleanup. As part of approving a move, the following planning must be done, and decisions made and recorded.

For units vacating existing space:

  • Develop and implement a plan for the removal of all moveable items and waste (including hazardous waste) to ensure the space vacated is safe for future occupants and in broom clean condition.
  • Identify who is responsible for moving and cleanup costs (including hazardous waste).
  • Identify who is responsible for costs if repairs, beyond those associated with normal wear and tear, are required.NOTE: Unlike accidental damage (e.g., unexpectedly knocking a hole in the wall), normal wear and tear occurs over time and with regular use. It generally means damage that happens through:
    • The ordinary day-to-day appropriate use of a space by a tenant (e.g. carpet gets worn from people walking on it); and
    • The ordinary operation of natural forces (e.g. sunlight, rain).
  • If the responsible unit defaults on the plan as it relates to cleanup and/or repairs, the University completes the cleanup and/or repairs and charges actual costs to the responsible unit.

For new occupants of existing space:

  • Identify who is responsible for moving and cleanup costs.
  • Identify who is responsible for minor capital improvement costs, if any.
  • Identify who is responsible for costs of structural or safety upgrades, if any.
New Facilities

When a capital project is approved, all costs beyond the capital costs must be considered and responsibility for funding identified and recorded. Such costs include both ongoing operating costs (whether state funded or not), moving, equipment, furniture, and other one-time costs.

State-Funded Projects

NOTE: The state does not allow moving costs or custodial and grounds equipment startup to be charged to the capital budget. These are considered operating costs because the expenses are not part of the long-lived (bondable) building asset.

Allocation /Reallocation Considerations

Consider the need to assess the following before setting policy and reallocating vacant space:

  • Adopting best practices for the allocation and management of University space so that space resources are leveraged to achieve maximum results.
  • Fostering transparency, consistency, and fairness in the application of policies.
  • Establishing standards that accommodate diversity of needs and functions, while recognizing the condition of space.
  • Ensuring that the space audit and reallocation process provide for periodic assessment of space needs and adjustment in allocated space.
  • Assessing the potential for using a space allocation model and/or incentives for areas to give up or share space where appropriate.
  • Cultivating an environment that encourages or rewards space shared across departments and disciplines.
  • Ensuring a clear linkage between space allocation and units’ mission, goals, expectations, and outcomes.

WSU Spokane Riverpoint Campus Space Allocation Policy

Overview

All Washington State University buildings, space, and land, regardless of fund source or location, belong to the University as a whole.

Long-range planning for optimum use of these valuable University assets is a continuing process.

All WSU Spokane space is subject to assignment and reassignment by the Chancellor or his/her designees to meet the overall needs and best interest of the institution.

All WSU Spokane colleges/departments are assigned areas and have the authority to move and allocate within their own unit. Colleges/departments must complete and submit campus space request forms for any space requests outside assigned areas. The campus Chancellor reviews and approves such requests.

NOTE: This policy does not replace BPPM 20.45 as it relates to real property.

Implementation Guidelines

Impact of Budget Decisions

During each annual budget review process, the impact of budget decisions on assigned space is addressed. Accordingly, information about the needs regarding amount and suitability of space is gathered as a routine part of the information WSU Spokane solicits from areas. As an outcome of each unit’s total operating or capital budget decisions, vacant space may be created, existing space may need to be reassigned, and/or existing space may need to be renovated.

Space Allocation Requests

Space allocation requests are to be directed to Facilities Operations using the campus space request form.

Space Assignment Decisions

Space assignment decisions are based upon thorough review of the subject space in relation to the University’s strategic priorities, including costs associated with using the space.

Assignments of space include, but are not be limited to, the following factors:

  • Facility cost of maintenance and operations. (State allocations for maintenance and operations (M&O) are less than required. To the degree possible, there are financial pressures to consolidate space in order to efficiently use the available funding.)
  • Technology infrastructure suitability, HVAC, repairs.
  • Alternate uses of subject space. (In meeting a requesting unit’s need for a particular space, are there other spaces that would meet their needs in a less expensive or quicker way?)
  • Competing needs and their strategic importance. (If two or more units request the same space, how can the University meet the needs of the units; e.g., what alternative space meets the needs of one or the other of the units?)
  • Future plans for the existing facility. (Evaluate the level of capital investment in a building against the expected years of use; e.g., if the building is the future site for a larger building.)
  • Acquisition of new buildings (including purchase or construction) and/or leased space.
Existing Facilities

In the absence of a documented decision to the contrary, a vacating unit is responsible for securing the funding for the move if the unit initiates the move. If the move is involuntary, the unit is not required to cover the costs of moving and the associated cleanup. As part of approving a move, the following planning must be done, and decisions made and recorded.

For units vacating existing space:

  • Develop and implement a plan for the removal of all moveable items and waste (including hazardous waste) to ensure the space vacated is safe for future occupants and in broom clean condition.
  • Identify who is responsible for moving and cleanup costs (including hazardous waste).
  • Identify who is responsible for costs if repairs, beyond those associated with normal wear and tear, are required.NOTE: Unlike accidental damage (e.g., unexpectedly knocking a hole in the wall), normal wear and tear occurs over time and with regular use. It generally means damage that happens through:
    • The ordinary day-to-day appropriate use of a space by a tenant (e.g. carpet gets worn from people walking on it); and
    • The ordinary operation of natural forces (e.g. sunlight, rain).
  • If the responsible unit defaults on the plan as it relates to cleanup and/or repairs, the University completes the cleanup and/or repairs and charges actual costs to the responsible unit.

For new occupants of existing space:

  • Identify who is responsible for moving and cleanup costs.
  • Identify who is responsible for minor capital improvement costs, if any.
  • Identify who is responsible for costs of structural or safety upgrades, if any.
New Facilities

When a capital project is approved, all costs beyond the capital costs must be considered and responsibility for funding identified and recorded. Such costs include both ongoing operating costs (whether state funded or not), moving, equipment, furniture, and other one-time costs.

State-Funded Projects

NOTE: The state does not allow moving costs or custodial and grounds equipment startup to be charged to the capital budget. These are considered operating costs because the expenses are not part of the long-lived (bondable) building asset.

Allocation / Reallocation Considerations

Consider the need to assess the following before setting policy and reallocating vacant space:

  • Adopting best practices for the allocation and management of University space so that space resources are leveraged to achieve maximum results.
  • Fostering transparency, consistency, and fairness in the application of policies.
  • Establishing standards that accommodate diversity of needs and functions, while recognizing the condition of space.
  • Ensuring that the space audit and reallocation process provide for periodic assessment of space needs and adjustment in allocated space.
  • Assessing the potential for using a space allocation model and/or incentives for areas to give up or share space where appropriate.
  • Cultivating an environment that encourages or rewards space shared across departments and disciplines. (Shared spaced may be approved only through the space allocation process.)
  • Ensuring a clear linkage between space allocation and units’ mission, goals, expectations, and outcomes.

WSU Tri-Cities Space Allocation Policy

Overview

All Washington State University buildings, space, and land, regardless of fund source or location, belong to the University as a whole.

Long-range planning for optimum use of these valuable University assets is a continuing process.

All WSU Tri-Cities space is subject to assignment and reassignment by the Chancellor or his/her designees to meet the overall needs and best interest of the institution.

NOTE: This policy does not replace BPPM 20.45 as it relates to real property.

Implementation Guidelines

Impact of Budget Decisions

During each annual budget review process, the impact of budget decisions on assigned space is addressed. Accordingly, information about the needs regarding amount and suitability of space is gathered as a routine part of the information WSU Tri-Cities solicits from areas. As an outcome of each unit’s total operating or capital budget decisions, vacant space may be created, existing space may need to be reassigned, and/or existing space may need to be renovated.

Space Allocation Requests

Space allocation requests are to be directed to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration. Requests are then forwarded to the WSU Tri-Cities Space Committee, which includes the following members:

  • Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
  • Assistant Vice Chancellor for Professional Programs
  • Assistant Vice Chancellor for Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Vice Chancellor Finance and Administration
  • Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
  • Development Director
  • Information Technology Services representative

Building Maintenance Lead, Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), and other facilities staff as appropriate act as consultants to this committee.

Space Assignment Decisions

Space assignment decisions are based upon thorough review of the subject space in relation to the University’s strategic priorities, including costs associated with using the space.

Review of Subject Space

The review includes, but is not limited to, the following factors:

  • Facility cost of maintenance and operations. (State allocations for maintenance and operations (M&O) are less than required. To the degree possible, there are financial pressures to consolidate space in order to efficiently use the available funding.)
  • Technology infrastructure suitability, HVAC, repairs.
  • Alternate uses of subject space. (In meeting a requesting unit’s need for a particular space, are there other spaces that would meet their needs in a less expensive or quicker way?)
  • Competing needs and their strategic importance. (If two or more units request the same space, how can the University meet the needs of the units; e.g., what alternative space meets the needs of one or the other of the units?)
  • Future plans for the existing facility. (Evaluate the level of capital investment in a building against the expected years of use; e.g., if the building is the future site for a larger building.)
  • Acquisition of new buildings (including purchase or construction) and/or leased space.
Existing Facilities

The units participating in moves are not required to cover the costs of moving and the associated cleanup. As part of the moving process, Facilities and EHS carry out the following planning:

  • Develop and implement a plan for the removal of all moveable items and waste (including hazardous waste) to ensure the space vacated is safe for future occupants and in broom clean condition.
  • Carry out repairs, beyond those associated with normal wear and tear, as appropriate.NOTE: Unlike accidental damage (e.g., unexpectedly knocking a hole in the wall), normal wear and tear occurs over time and with regular use. It generally means damage that happens through:
    • The ordinary day-to-day appropriate use of a space by a tenant (e.g. carpet gets worn from people walking on it); and
    • The ordinary operation of natural forces (e.g. sunlight, rain).
New Facilities

When a capital project is approved, the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration ensures that all costs beyond the capital costs are considered and funding identified and recorded. Such costs include both ongoing operating costs (whether state funded or not), moving, equipment, furniture, and other one-time costs.

State-Funded Projects

NOTE: The state does not allow moving costs or custodial and grounds equipment startup to be charged to the capital budget. These are considered operating costs because the expenses are not part of the long-lived (bondable) building asset.

Allocation /Reallocation Considerations

The WSU Tri-Cities Space Committee assesses the following before setting policy and reallocating vacant space:

  • Adopting best practices for the allocation and management of University space so that space resources are leveraged to achieve maximum results.
  • Fostering transparency, consistency, and fairness in the application of policies.
  • Establishing standards that accommodate diversity of needs and functions, while recognizing the condition of space.
  • Ensuring that the space audit and reallocation process provide for periodic assessment of space needs and adjustment in allocated space.
  • Assessing the potential for using a space allocation model and/or incentives for areas to give up or share space where appropriate.
  • Cultivating an environment that encourages or rewards space shared across departments and disciplines.
  • Ensuring a clear linkage between space allocation and units’ mission, goals, expectations, and outcomes.

WSU Vancouver Space Allocation Policy

Overview

All Washington State University buildings, space, and land, regardless of fund source or location, belong to the University as a whole.

Long-range planning for optimum use of these valuable University assets is a continuing process.

All WSU Vancouver space is subject to assignment and reassignment by the Chancellor or his/her designees to meet the overall needs and best interest of the institution.

NOTE: This policy does not replace BPPM 20.45 as it relates to real property.

Implementation Guidelines

Impact of Budget Decisions

During each annual budget review process, the impact of budget decisions on assigned space is addressed. Accordingly, information about the needs regarding amount and suitability of space is gathered as a routine part of the information WSU Vancouver solicits from areas. As an outcome of each operating or capital budget decision, vacant space may be created, existing space may need to be reassigned, and/or existing space may need to be renovated.

Space Allocation Requests

Space allocation requests are to be directed to the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Operations. Depending on complexity and timing, requests may then be forwarded to the WSU Vancouver Space Advisory Committee, which typically includes the following members:

  • Two research-engaged faculty from different academic units/disciplines
  • Faculty Organization Executive Committee (FOEC) representative
  • Director of Research
  • Student Affairs representative
  • Academic Leadership Council (ALC) designee
  • Capital Planning representative

Building Maintenance Representative, EHS, and other facilities staff, as appropriate, act as consultants to this committee. Space Advisory Committee recommendations are forwarded to the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Operations who makes decisions in collaboration with the campus budget council.

Space Assignment Decisions

Space assignment decisions are based upon thorough review of the subject space in relation to the University’s strategic priorities, including costs associated with using the space.

The review includes, but is not limited to, the following factors:

  • Facility cost of maintenance and operations. (State allocations for maintenance and operations (M&O) are less than required. To the degree possible, there are financial pressures to consolidate space in order to efficiently use the available funding.)
  • Technology infrastructure suitability, HVAC, repairs.
  • Alternate uses of subject space. (In meeting a requesting unit’s need for a particular space, are there other spaces that would meet their needs in a less expensive or quicker way?)
  • Competing needs and their strategic importance. (If two or more units request the same space, how can the University meet the needs of the units; e.g., what alternative space meets the needs of one or the other of the units?)
  • Future plans for the existing facility. (Evaluate the level of capital investment in a building against the expected years of use; e.g., if the building is the future site for a larger building.)
  • Acquisition of new buildings (including purchase or construction) and/or leased space.

Allocation / Reallocation Considerations

The WSU Vancouver Space Advisory Committee assesses the following before setting policy and reallocating vacant space:

  • Adopting best practices for the allocation and management of University space so that space resources are leveraged to achieve maximum results.
  • Fostering transparency, consistency, and fairness in the application of policies.
  • Establishing standards that accommodate diversity of needs and functions, while recognizing the condition of space.
  • Ensuring that the space audit and reallocation process provide for periodic assessment of space needs and adjustment in allocated space.
  • Assessing the potential for using a space allocation model and/or incentives for areas to give up or share space where appropriate.
  • Cultivating an environment that encourages or rewards space shared across departments and disciplines.
  • Ensuring a clear linkage between space allocation and units’ mission, goals, expectations, and outcomes.